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Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Specialists in Dental Implants

What is Osseointegration?


Women patient in dental chair smiling at the cameraMany are already familiar with how bones are capable of regenerating themselves after having an untimely snap. If you break an arm, there’s a good chance you can count on being in a cast for around twelve weeks. Once they remove the cast, though it is likely you might feel a bit weak, you have an appendage miraculously repaired that chances are works as good as new! Using this natural healing ability, Malmquist Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery can help you rebuild any missing teeth from your smile with this incredible process, which is known as osseointegration.

Building You Up One Piece at a Time


For a person missing several teeth for a long time, the bone can, unfortunately, begin to resorb itself. This erosion can give a sunken appearance and affect how the jaw works. In time, it can cause immense discomfort and result in the loss of more teeth. A graft can be used to strengthen the remaining tissue through the integration process.

The best choice is often harvested from the host, which will usually be a specimen extracted from harder areas such as the chin. Alternative sources can be gathered from both human and animal donors or supplied synthetically, which is manufactured in laboratories. It is often supplemented with a healthy dose of proteins to give the restoration a boost and encourage an even greater bond.

Working with Your Body Naturally


After the grafting process is complete, it can require nearly the same amount of time as it would regrowing any other bone. For a full recovery, we generally recommend at least six months before starting the next phase of your treatment plan. When it has healed enough to support the pressure that is required by the mouth to chew food, then we can begin restoring the dental structure.

A hole will often be created in the jaw through the use of a specialized drill that gets deep down where the root used to be. Inserted into the hole is a small titanium rod which serves as a replacement anchor. Discovered to be biocompatible with bone cells, it has been preferred over other suggestions known to demonstrate compatibility properties, such as zirconium. The titanium post can be enhanced by creating an alloy with interactive elements to ensure a secure and thorough bonding.

Through this, the rod has adhered to the bone, and it can become just as strong as the original. If taken care of just like regular teeth, it can become permanent. Once this has healed enough, an abutment is used to connect the rod to the enamel, which is designed to look like your actual tooth. As a result of grafting and dental implants, we can take old tissue, and using new cells, strengthen the regenerated area to allow for greater overall resilience.

The amazing integration of natural and man-made materials has developed an ability that allows us to take the basic building blocks of creation and find a way to restore the degeneration of another living being. If you have any questions or would like to hear details about this fascinating discovery, please call Malmquist Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery at (503) 446-6776 for more information.


Fax:

503-297-7810

Address:

1750 SW Harbor Way, Suite # 100, Portland, OR. 97201

Hours:


Mon - Thu: 8:00am–4:30pm
Friday: 7:00am–2:00pm
Saturday: By Appointment Only
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